Mar
24
9:10 AM09:10

Forum: Mr. Timothy Sabin and the Rev. James C. Holmes, "Heirs through Hope - Part III"

Many outside the Episcopal Church think of us as an assemblage of the privileged and indolent, unaware that an energized sense of mission has characterized our denomination since its gathering in 1789. Mary A. Thompson's 1871 manifesto "O Zion, haste, thy mission high fulfilling, to tell to all the world that God is light" has provided the rallying cry for Episcopalians throughout our catholic and evangelical outreach to others for a century and a half.  Join us back in the Gallery for the third session in Tim Sabin and Jim Holmes' Lenten series on the Episcopal Church.

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Mar
31
9:10 AM09:10

Forum: Mr. Timothy Sabin and the Rev. James C. Holmes, "Heirs through Hope - Part IV"

The first hymnal of The Episcopal Church was the 150 songs called the Book of Psalms. The poet of Psalm 119 writes: “Thy word is a lamp unto our feet, and a light unto our path.” (119:105) Such language is an apt description of the affecting and compelling archetypes which, for virtually 500 years, have been found throughout the volume in which the Psalter has always been included, theBook of Common Prayer. However, has the Prayer Book served its purpose and is now obsolete? Or will the urgent needs of our generation find new life in its pages? Join Jim Holmes and Tim Sabin on Sunday, March 31, at 9:10 in the Gallery for a discussion of the Book of Common Prayer. 

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Apr
7
9:10 AM09:10

Forum: Mr. Timothy Sabin and the Rev. James C. Holmes, "Heirs through Hope - Part V"

In its General Thanksgiving, the Prayer Book prompts us to give particular thanks for “the means of grace and hope of glory.” These twin concepts show forth our quiet confidence in the benefits of our two sacraments of Baptism and the Holy Communion, as well as in our other sacramental acts and devotional practices. This final forum in the series explores the means our Church offers for participating in the rich measure of religious experience that we share with other sacramental denominations. Come join Jim Holmes and Tim Sabin on Sunday, April 7, at 9:10 in the Gallery to conclude our Lenten conversation. 

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Apr
28
9:10 AM09:10

Forum: Margy McCampbell, "Utanapishtim’s Flood Story"

In 1872, George Smith, a budding Assyriologist with the British Museum, completed a translation of cuneiform tablets from ashurbanipal’s library, telling of a devasting flood -- complete with details strikingly similar to the flood described in Genesis. Smith was stunned. This story was 2,000 years older than when contemporary experts dated the Genesis story! Margy McCampbell will lead us through an explanation of the two flood stories and the 19th Century ramifications of the veracity of God’s Holy Word, and what it means for us as we navigate new truths about our biblical heritage. Margy is a frequent parishioner at Emmanuel and has recently retired from the Community College of Baltimore, where she taught English. She earned a Bachelor’s degree from UMBC and Master’s degrees from Morgan State University and Johns Hopkins University.

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May
5
9:10 AM09:10

Forum: Dr. Rebecca Hancock, "A Time to Laugh: Humor in the Bible"

The Old Testament has God laughing, both in enjoyment and in mockery. The New Testament describes Jesus' use of irony, paradox, and banter. In this forum, we will examine together the Bible's use of humor, with special attention to the book of Jonah. We will consider the question of how and why humor is used, by whom, and how recognizing humor in the Bible helps us, as contemporary persons of faith, to become more faithful in our Christian living. Dr. Rebecca Hancock teaches Old Testament at St. Mary's Ecumenical Institute, and she also works as the Coordinator of Communications and Student Services. She received her Ph.D. from Harvard University's Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations in Hebrew Bible. Rebecca teaches a variety of classes related to the field of Old Testament, including biblical Hebrew, Psalms, Prophets, and a course on the Decalogue. Her research interests are related to gender, ethnicity, and social constructions in the ancient world.

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May
12
9:10 AM09:10

Forum: the Rev. Joseph Wood, “Banish from It every unclean spirit”

Even as movies like The Conjuring, The Rite, and (most of all) The Exorcist continue to haunt our popular imagination, the Episcopal Church only dedicates one page to the practice of exorcism in its official resources, and even that mention offers scant details. Our Associate Rector will examine what is discussed in the Book of Occasional Services, explore where we can still find other traces of exorcism in broader Christian tradition, and perhaps begin to answer why the ritual has maintained such an indelible presence in modern culture. What do we mean when we talk about exorcism? And why -- when topics like angels and demons have largely become the subject of derision -- do we keep waiting for an old priest and a young priest to come knocking?

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Mar
17
9:10 AM09:10

Forum: Mr. Timothy Sabin and the Rev. James C. Holmes, "Heirs through Hope - Part II, Jerusalem, My Happy Home"

Jerusalem, My Happy Home, a hymn beloved of generations of Episcopalians, sets the tone for the second in Jim Holmes' and Tim Sabin's five-part Lenten series on the Episcopal Church. Participants will gather at the back of the church and follow a pilgrim's path through the iconography and architecture of the physical building, leading to the high altar's offering of a spiritual and peaceful Jerusalem in the present time.

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Mar
10
9:10 AM09:10

Forum: Mr. Timothy Sabin and the Rev. James C. Holmes, "Heirs through Hope - Part I, All People that on Earth do Dwell"

Entitled All People that on Earth do Dwell, the first session of this five-part series will focus on the history and structure of the Church, and will include a brief video.  Please join Tim and Jim and bring your questions and insights about our life together in what our Presiding Bishop had called “The Episcopal Branch of the Jesus Movement.”

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Mardi Gras Party
Mar
5
5:30 PM17:30

Mardi Gras Party

The Urbanites are organizing our annual Mardi Gras celebration of food and music. The cost is $15 in advance (kids are $10) or $20 at the door. Yellow Hen will serve Creole food, with live New Orleans style jazz by Tongue in Cheek. Please sign-up on the sheet in the Narthex or via the donate page of our website.


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Mar
3
9:10 AM09:10

Forum: Dr. Matthew Crenson, "Struggling to Understand Our Struggles – Part II"

Dr. Matthew Crenson is a political scientist who specializes in the study of urban politics and American political development. He received his PhD at the University of Chicago, and in 1969 joined the Department of Political Science at Johns Hopkins University and retired 38 years later as head of the Department. He is the author of numerous books and is frequently interviewed by the media. He will lead us in a two-part discussion examining how American politics reached its current state. Does the Trump presidency represent a short-term detour from the arc of our political history, or does it reflect something more permanent in this country’s unwritten constitution? It’s obvious that the political divisions in the United States are sharper and perhaps more rancorous than they have been in the recent past -- don’t forget the Civil War -- but exactly what we’re about is not so clear. This two forum rumination on our current political circumstances, where they came from, where we are, and where we’re headed, invites extensive contributions, questions, and challenges from the listeners.

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Feb
24
9:10 AM09:10

Forum: Dr. Matthew Crenson, "Struggling to Understand Our Struggles – Part I"

Dr. Matthew Crenson is a political scientist who specializes in the study of urban politics and American political development. He received his PhD at the University of Chicago, and in 1969 joined the Department of Political Science at Johns Hopkins University and retired 38 years later as head of the Department. He is the author of numerous books and is frequently interviewed by the media. He will lead us in a two-part discussion examining how American politics reached its current state. Does the Trump presidency represent a short-term detour from the arc of our political history, or does it reflect something more permanent in this country’s unwritten constitution? It’s obvious that the political divisions in the United States are sharper and perhaps more rancorous than they have been in the recent past -- don’t forget the Civil War -- but exactly what we’re about is not so clear. This two forum rumination on our current political circumstances, where they came from, where we are, and where we’re headed, invites extensive contributions, questions, and challenges from the listeners.

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Feb
17
9:10 AM09:10

Forum: Dr. Sherwood Githens, "Who We Are and How We Got Here – Part II"

Dr. Sherwood Githens will discuss David Reich’s 2018 book, Who We Are And How We Got Here: Ancient DNA And The New Science Of The Human Past. “Ancient DNA” refers to DNA extracted from human bones 50,000 years old and more -- including Neanderthals -- which is then sequenced. These ancient DNA sequences have allowed scientists to determine some of the relationships among migrations of groups of humans that are not possible using modern DNA sequences. The migrations of humans during prehistory in Africa, Europe, Asia, the South Seas, and the Americas will be summarized. Sherwood holds a Ph.D in biochemistry from Harvard University and has held numerous university teaching and administrative positions throughout his career.

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Feb
10
9:10 AM09:10

Forum: Dr. Sherwood Githens, "Who We Are and How We Got Here – Part I"

Dr. Sherwood Githens will discuss David Reich’s 2018 book, Who We Are And How We Got Here: Ancient DNA And The New Science Of The Human Past. “Ancient DNA” refers to DNA extracted from human bones 50,000 years old and more -- including Neanderthals -- which is then sequenced. These ancient DNA sequences have allowed scientists to determine some of the relationships among migrations of groups of humans that are not possible using modern DNA sequences. The migrations of humans during prehistory in Africa, Europe, Asia, the South Seas, and the Americas will be summarized. Sherwood holds a Ph.D in biochemistry from Harvard University and has held numerous university teaching and administrative positions throughout his career.

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Feb
3
9:10 AM09:10

Forum: Peter Dunn, "The Samaritan Community: Crisis Prevention Assistance and Empowerment Programs"

Peter Dunn, Director of Community Relations at the Samaritan Community, will discuss the activities of their assistance and empowerment programs, which include: food pantry operation; clothing shop/computer workroom; individual case management; emergency financial assistance; individual empowerment counseling; group support; and life enrichment. The Emmanuel Outreach Committee awarded a grant of $5,000 to the Samaritan Community in 2018, which was used to support the overall program of the Community’s activities as listed above. (We also assist the Samaritan Community throughout the year via the Frank Russell Memorial Clothing Drive and other donations.) Herschel Wade, chair of the Outreach Committee, will introduce the speaker and briefly discuss Emmanuel’s relationship with the grantee during the past two years.

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Jan
27
9:10 AM09:10

Forum: Dr. Arthur Sutherland, "The Wit and Wisdom of Martin Luther King, Jr. - Part II"

Dr. Arthur Sutherland is Associate Professor of Theology at Loyola University, Maryland, and recently won a grant from the Project on Lived Theology to support a critical commentary on “Letter from a Birmingham Jail.” Dr. King is well known for his speeches and sermons—indeed, phrases like “injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere” have become part of our national quote book. However, there is another side to King revealed in his private letters and lesser known public addresses: his wit and wisdom. This two-week study will examine a selection of King’s writings that link the power of laughter to the work of love.

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Jan
20
9:10 AM09:10

Forum: Dr. Arthur Sutherland, "The Wit and Wisdom of Martin Luther King, Jr. - Part I"

Dr. Arthur Sutherland is Associate Professor of Theology at Loyola University, Maryland, and recently won a grant from the Project on Lived Theology to support a critical commentary on “Letter from a Birmingham Jail.” Dr. King is well known for his speeches and sermons—indeed, phrases like “injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere” have become part of our national quote book. However, there is another side to King revealed in his private letters and lesser known public addresses: his wit and wisdom. This two-week study will examine a selection of King’s writings that link the power of laughter to the work of love.

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Bishop Sutton's Visitation
Jan
20
8:30 AM08:30

Bishop Sutton's Visitation

The Right Reverend Eugene Taylor Sutton, Bishop of Maryland, will make his visit to Emmanuel on Sunday, January 20. Bishop Sutton will preside and preach at both the 8:30 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. services, assisted by one of the diocese’s arch-deacons, the Venerable Ruth Elder. Between services he will meet with the Vestry, and there will be a time for a Questions & Answers period with the bishop at the end of the 10:30 a.m service. Please join us in welcoming the bishop and sharing with him the treasures of Emmanuel.

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Jan
13
9:10 AM09:10

Forum: Rabbi Daniel Burg, "All Things Jewish"

Christianity traces its origins to a Jewish man from a Jewish community in the land of Israel. What is Judaism? How is it similar to and different from the other Abrahamic Faiths? How has it developed over time? What are some principles of Jewish faith and practice? How is it there can be two Jews with three opinions? We’ll explore these and other questions as we navigate a 4,000 year-old people’s quest for meaning in a sometimes tumultuous world. Our forum will be led by Rabbi Daniel Cotzin Burg of Beth Am Synagogue. He was ordained and received his MA at the American Jewish University in Los Angeles after obtaining a BA in Hebrew Studies and Anthropology from the University of Wisconsin.

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Dec
23
9:10 AM09:10

Forum: Neil O'Farrell, "Evil and Incarnation - Part III"

Liberal theology since the Enlightenment has avoided talk of palpable evil in the world and humankind’s participation in it. Examining evil without at the same time talking about redemption through Jesus’ incarnation—as well as our human incarnation through God’s gracious Holy Spirit—would be an incomplete review of such a serious topic. So, as the Christian church heads towards Christmas, the liturgical year gives us warrant to look at things that are of both the dark and the light. Evil didn’t go away because Christians grew weary of discussing it or because it seemed primitive and judgmental. Evil is a theme throughout our scriptures. Jesus evinced no fuzzy thinking about evil, nor did he rationalize it away, or draw back from it. Moreover, it is a subject that has engaged theologians, philosophers, mystics, teachers, and prophets for millennia. Discussing evil requires sophistication and honesty, as well as level headedness that doesn’t allow for hyperbole or crass knee-jerk reactions. This series will consider history, theology, and contemporary analysis—even using psychology, language, culture, and political theory. Interestingly, some of the most pungent, helpful writing comes from Anglican theologians such as N.T. Wright and C.S. Lewis. As always, conversation and probing questions will be a feature of these presentations. We have all staked our lives on the sure conviction that even the most wretched darkness can be broken by a small spark.

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Dec
20
5:30 PM17:30

Greening of the Church

Help us begin the decoration of the church for the Christmas season! Give yourself a quiet moment in the hectic whirl of Christmas preparation and join good friends for a special evening dressing the nave in nature’s evergreen bounty—there’s enough work for everyone hanging greens, making window arrangements, and hanging wreaths. Please bring your favorite heavy appetizer for 8 to share, and if you’d like, work or garden gloves. (All ages are welcome.)

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Dec
16
9:10 AM09:10

Forum: The Rev. Neil O'Farrell, "Evil and Incarnation - Part II"

Liberal theology since the Enlightenment has avoided talk of palpable evil in the world and humankind’s participation in it. Examining evil without at the same time talking about redemption through Jesus’ incarnation—as well as our human incarnation through God’s gracious Holy Spirit—would be an incomplete review of such a serious topic. So, as the Christian church heads towards Christmas, the liturgical year gives us warrant to look at things that are of both the dark and the light. Evil didn’t go away because Christians grew weary of discussing it or because it seemed primitive and judgmental. Evil is a theme throughout our scriptures. Jesus evinced no fuzzy thinking about evil, nor did he rationalize it away, or draw back from it. Moreover, it is a subject that has engaged theologians, philosophers, mystics, teachers, and prophets for millennia. Discussing evil requires sophistication and honesty, as well as level headedness that doesn’t allow for hyperbole or crass knee-jerk reactions. This series will consider history, theology, and contemporary analysis—even using psychology, language, culture, and political theory. Interestingly, some of the most pungent, helpful writing comes from Anglican theologians such as N.T. Wright and C.S. Lewis. As always, conversation and probing questions will be a feature of these presentations. We have all staked our lives on the sure conviction that even the most wretched darkness can be broken by a small spark.

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 White Supremacy, Power, and the Role of Interfaith: An Evening with Beverly Mitchell
Dec
12
7:00 PM19:00

White Supremacy, Power, and the Role of Interfaith: An Evening with Beverly Mitchell

Are anti-black racism and anti-Semitism related in the contemporary U.S. context? If so, what might this relationship tell us about whiteness and religion? Please join us for the Institute of Islamic, Christian, and Jewish Studies' (ICJS) annual Manekin-Clarke Lecture where Professor Mitchell will draw upon her previous work to answer some of the unsettling political and theological questions of our times. She will explore how her work can open myriad possibilities for interreligious engagement, while thinking through the numerous twenty-first century challenges facing minorities in the wake of an emboldened sense of white supremacy, nativism, jingoism, and xenophobic nationalism.

The lecture is free, but please register.

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Dec
9
9:10 AM09:10

Forum: The Rev. Neil O'Farrell, "Evil and Incarnation - Part I"

Liberal theology since the Enlightenment has avoided talk of palpable evil in the world and humankind’s participation in it. Examining evil without at the same time talking about redemption through Jesus’ incarnation—as well as our human incarnation through God’s gracious Holy Spirit—would be an incomplete review of such a serious topic. So, as the Christian church heads towards Christmas, the liturgical year gives us warrant to look at things that are of both the dark and the light. Evil didn’t go away because Christians grew weary of discussing it or because it seemed primitive and judgmental. Evil is a theme throughout our scriptures. Jesus evinced no fuzzy thinking about evil, nor did he rationalize it away, or draw back from it. Moreover, it is a subject that has engaged theologians, philosophers, mystics, teachers, and prophets for millennia. Discussing evil requires sophistication and honesty, as well as level headedness that doesn’t allow for hyperbole or crass knee-jerk reactions. This series will consider history, theology, and contemporary analysis—even using psychology, language, culture, and political theory. Interestingly, some of the most pungent, helpful writing comes from Anglican theologians such as N.T. Wright and C.S. Lewis. As always, conversation and probing questions will be a feature of these presentations. We have all staked our lives on the sure conviction that even the most wretched darkness can be broken by a small spark.

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Nov
18
9:10 AM09:10

Forum: The Rev. Katrina Grusell, "The Vibrant Hope of Revelation"

The Book of Revelation is often read as a literal prophecy for the future with an emphasis on symbolic interpretation as the key to a divine timetable. However, exploration of the contextual theology of the author and the genre of apocalyptic literature yields deeper meaning from this beautiful, if enigmatic, text. With fresh eyes and listening hearts that engage the divine imagination, the Book of Revelation provides vibrant hope in times to replace injustice and despair. Our forum will be lead by the Rev. Katrina Grusell, who currently serves in many capacities, including: Episcopal Chaplain at UMBC; Administer of Pastoral Care at St. John’s, Ellicott City; and Chaplain to the Corporation for the Relief of Widows and Children of the Clergy in the Episcopal Church in Maryland.

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Oct
28
9:10 AM09:10

Forum: the Rev. Joshua Rodriquez-Hobbs, "Honoring My Wishes: My Voice Matters - An Advance Directive Workshop"

The Rev. Joshua Rodriguez-Hobbs will lead us through a workshop focusing on the importance of the Advance Directive. End of life situations are difficult to discuss, but we know that if we have courage—In Advance—to document our wishes in written form we will have more peace and offer an extraordinary gift to our loved ones. The workshop will address four areas: what is an Advance Directive; why is it important to accurately and thoroughly complete one; how to communicate your wishes and protect Advance Directive information; and how to create a plan to complete an Advance Directive. Joshua is the Episcopal Chaplain to the Johns Hopkins Hospital, and prior to joining the Spiritual Care Department, he served as a Chaplain at Gilchrist Hospice Care and as a parish priest.

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Oct
21
9:10 AM09:10

Forum: Dr. Karen Brown, Intersection of Change Ministries

The Rev. Dr. Karen Brown is a Resource Developer at the Intersection of Change, which is a community-based nonprofit organization focused on community development. The organization is dedicated to providing programs that enrich the economic, social, and spiritual lives of those dealing with poverty-related issues. The Emmanuel Outreach Committee awarded a grant of $5,000 to the Intersection of Change in 2018, which in turned used the funds to support Strength to Love II. This program operates an urban farm and serves ex-offenders returning to the community by providing food gift certificates and offers employment, assistance with ID renewals, transportation to appointments, and other assistance as needed. Herschel Wade, Chair of the Outreach Committee, will introduce members of the Intersection of Change and speak briefly about the program.

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